Ramp Closures Scheduled for June 18-21 at Route 903 ‘E-ZPass-Only’ Interchange

Eight-hour overnight closures needed to install electronic toll equipment.
The Pennsylvania Turnpike advises Northeastern Extension motorists using the Route 903 E-ZPass Only Interchange, Exit 87, in Carbon County, that the entrance ramps will be closed nightly from June 18 through 21 to allow technicians to safely install overhead electronic toll equipment.
Each night starting at 9 p.m. until 5 a.m., both entry ramps will be closed. During the ramp closures, motorists will not be able to enter the Northeastern Extension at State Route 903. Motorists should seek alternate routes by using the nearest available interchange on I-476 depending on your direction of travel.
Work schedules are subject to change based on weather conditions.

To report an accident or other emergencies on the PA Turnpike, dial *11 on your mobile phone.

To learn more about PA Turnpike conditions or to contact us, use one of these resources:

ON THE PA TURNPIKE
·        Variable & Digital Message Signs — nearly 100 signs along the Turnpike
·        Highway Advisory Radio — 1640 AM (tune-in near interchanges)
BY PHONE
·        Turnpike Roadway Information Program (toll-free) — 866-976-TRIP (8747)
·        Customer Assistance Center (toll-free) — 800-331-3414 (weekdays, 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.)
ON THE WEB
·        TRIPTalk — free, travel-alert smartphone app; download at https://www.paturnpike.com/travel/trip_talk.aspx
·        Travel Conditions Map — live, interactive conditions map; view at https://www.paturnpike.com/webmap
·        Waze  — a crowd-sourced navigation app that provides real-time traffic conditions with input from other drivers; download at https://www.waze.com

 

Protect Your Aging Relatives from Heat Exhaustion and
Dehydration This Summer

Of the 8,000-plus heat-related deaths reported annually in the United States, 36 percent are among those age 65 and older, according to a Centers for Disease Control Heat-Related Illness Survey. Hospitalizations for heat-related symptoms increase for those over 85.

Everyone wants to ensure their loved ones are comfortable and safe during the hot weather, but checking up on neighbors and non-relatives can go a long way toward stemming the tide of heat and dehydration deaths. Griswold Home Care of Luzerne & Lackawanna Counties offers the following advice:

Perform an air conditioner check. Air conditioning is the top protection against heat-related illness. If the home isn’t air conditioned, buy a room unit or encourage your loved one to go to a public place during the hottest hours of the day, like a library or senior center.

Avoid dehydration. Non-alcoholic beverages will replace the body’s salts and minerals released from sweating. Put a glass of water in every room, and encourage sipping from them throughout the day. Frequently drinking small amounts is the best way to stay hydrated. Check your loved one’s urine; light yellow means they’re getting enough to drink; darker yellow means they’re not. Other symptoms include very dry skin, dizziness, rapid heartbeat or rapid breathing.

Know the signs of heat exhaustion. Too much heat can cause heat exhaustion or, even worse, heat stroke. Heat exhaustion happens when you become dehydrated and your body is unable to replace the fluid and electrolytes it has lost. The signs of heat exhaustion include heavy sweating, nausea, and feeling light-headed and faint.

If body temperature continues to rise, it can result in heatstroke, a serious medical condition. Signs of heatstroke include fainting, a body temperature above 104° F, confusion, flushed skin, irritability, and acting delirious. If you’re around someone with signs of heat exhaustion, call 911.

For more information, visit www.griswoldhomecare.com or call 570-338-4060.
 

Pocono Springs proposal

In the most recent edition of The Journal of the Pocono Plateau, we promised to upload the Pocono Springs presentation made recently in Tobyhanna Township. We weren't able to upload it here, but we did put it on our Facebook page, www.facebook.com/Journal-of-the-Pocono-Plateau-115632595121731/#
Please view it there.

PennDOT Launches Video to Assist Pennsylvanians in Navigating Roundabouts

Harrisburg, PA – The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) today launched a video to assist Pennsylvanians in navigating roundabouts. The video instructs viewers how to use both single and multi-lane roundabouts whether in a vehicle, on a bicycle or on foot.

The video can be accessed by visiting the roundabout page on www.penndot.gov or by visiting the department’s YouTube channel.
“Data shows that modern-day roundabouts reduce crash severity and injuries while improving traffic flow,” said PennDOT Secretary Leslie S. Richards. “This video illustrates how to navigate these intersections regardless of how you travel.”

A modern roundabout is a type of circular intersection where traffic flows continuously in a counterclockwise direction around a central island and where the entry traffic must yield to the circulating traffic. The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) encourages implementing roundabouts as they have been proven to significantly improve safety and reduce traffic delays over traditional stop- or signal-controlled intersections. In tandem with the FHWA’s recommendation, the Pennsylvania State Transportation Innovation Council (STIC) has prioritized implementing roundabouts as alternatives to traditional intersections when possible.

Crash rates and severity of at least three years of data from before and after installation for the state’s first 10 modern roundabouts built at previous traditional stop-sign or signal-controlled intersections showed that fatal crashes were eliminated (two to zero) and major-injury crashes were also eliminated (four to zero). Additionally, moderate-injury crashes were reduced by 71 percent (seven to two) and minor-injury crashes by 25 percent (16 to 12) as well as the total number of crashes which dropped by 16 percent (63 to 53).

National studies have shown that modern roundabouts reduce fatal crashes by up to 90 percent and result in a 75 percent reduction in injury-causing crashes. Modern roundabouts also improve pedestrian safety by allowing people to cross shorter distances with slower moving one-way traffic.

Modern roundabouts have been being built in the United States for less than 30 years and in Pennsylvania for less than 15 years. In Pennsylvania, there are currently 32 completed roundabouts, 20 under construction and at least 10 more expected to go to construction over the next two years. To learn more about roundabouts, visit www.penndot.gov and enter “roundabouts” in the search bar.

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